Protest

Julie DOWLING: artist

Not On Display

About the work


This painting is about the many faces of First Nation people at a protest
rally or march.
My first protest march was in 1984 when I was fifteen years old. The
one I remember the most, with pride, was protesting the bicentennial
‘celebrations’ in 1988. Thousands of people were marching against
government propaganda, telling us to assimilate by celebrating our
invasion, and wanting us to call ourselves ‘Australian Aboriginals’. We
were all branded as ‘unpatriotic’ and ‘un-Australian’ by the media and
politicians.
I met many of my kin and friends in Perth as we marched together. When
you march in a peaceful rally and are surrounded by angry racist people,
and police are trying to stop you from marching, you realise what your
elders and ancestors knowledge mean to you. It ultimately means life
and freedom; your life and your freedom are worth fighting for.
Title
Protest
Artist/Maker and role
Julie DOWLING: artist
Date
1999
Medium
synthetic polymer paint, red ochre and metallic paint on canvas
Measurements
100.0 x 120.0 cm
Credit line
Gift of Brigitte Braun, 2017
State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia
Accession number
2017/0053

This is one of the paintings in our collection.



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